Sunday, April 3, 2016

When You Aren't Up for Writing...

Some days you just want to lay on the couch and bury your head in a pillow.
I've been a bit exhausted lately. I was very busy with Easter performances over the weekend, and I injured my back somehow, which means I've been in pain, which wears me down even more. All in all, I've tried to get some writing in, but I haven't been able to focus the way I'd like. So I decided to give myself a bit of a break. But, I still wanted to use my time well. So how could I work on writing, but not write? Here are my ideas.

1. Read

I love to read, but it's hard to find the time to focus on a novel (one reason I often read collections of short stories). But this week, I read one non-fiction parenting book, and I'm getting into Ann Leckie's Ancillary Justice, which I've been meaning to read for a while. Reading helps recharge my writing batteries.

2. Edit

I've been meaning to re-read a few old short stories to polish and edit them some more. I don't have the energy for intensive editing, but sometimes it's good to get a quick overview of where the story's at, and if it's working the way I want it to.

3. Outline

I've been a bit stuck on the novel I'm working on (I'd been mostly working on short stories the past two months), but I want to get back into it. I've been developing an outline to sort of clarify the plot in my head, and that's helped a lot.

4. Sleep

I don't do this enough. That makes thinking hard. I'm trying to catch up.

5. Long Walks

These are a good time to think, reflect, and imagine. I've always enjoyed being outside, and I'm hoping the exercise will do me good. It helps me clear my head, and gave me the idea for this blog.

8 comments:

  1. Nice post! I had a softball coach tell me once during a slump, "Good hitters are still good hitters, even when they're not hitting." I believe that applies in a way to writers. We're still writers, even when we're not writing. And the experiences that happen away from the keyboard or notebook affect our work as strongly as anything.

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    1. That's good advice from your softball coach! I think it's easy to forget that all artists need to rest and reflect every once in a while.

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    2. Easy to feel guilt when you are too tired/buy to write. Especially when everyone around you seems to be scoring 1,000 words a day. Nice to be reminded there is more to life than pounding a keyboard..and anyway, we are always writing in our heads!

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    3. So true! I think sometimes we forget the time we spend thinking about our next book/writing project is an important part of the process.

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  2. It was good to read this today - I managed 500 words this morning then suddenly thought 'I'm too tired'. Recently had op and knee probs, and have some back and neck pain, and pain does wear you down, doesn't it? When I face up to the fact that I'm not up to it, I use the time by catching up on emails, reading my ever long list of books to review - and by having a nap! Thanks for this, today :)

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    1. You're welcome! Yes, pain makes it hard to concentrate on writing, and sometimes we need to focus our energy on healing. The writing will still be there when we've recovered:)

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  3. I do think it's good to dissect before stepping back in and getting your writing mojo back. A good walk and/or yoga definitely does this for me :) Popping over from #MondayBlogs

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    1. Yes! Yoga definitely helps me feel calm and focused, and walks give me great inspiration.

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